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Archive for November, 2013

Sales Gets Too Much Credit and Too Much Cash for Selling

Posted by Bob Warfield on November 25, 2013

PutinCookiesOh boy, time for even more controversy.  Did he really just say that Sales gets too much credit?  Shouldn’t everybody be thinking that Sales is Job #1 for Everyone the way NetApp’s Tom Mendoza or countless other former Sales VP’s would?

It’s shocking, I know, for me to say what I just did and I don’t mean in any way to demean Sales. But all too often Sales wants to sit at the top of pantheon, call all the shots, take all the credit, get the biggest comp packages, and generally act like everyone should be working for them.

Boards and Investors eat this up because they’re short-term aligned, just like Sales, but we’ve seen countless times in American Business that there are problems with entrusting everything to the short-term mindset.  Just remember one thing–Steve Ballmer was a Salesman first and foremost, but it was on his watch that Microsoft lost their way.  It isn’t that Ballmer was necessarily a bad guy, or even a bad Sales Guy.  He’ll be the first to point to the steady growth in Microsoft profitability over his tenure.  Yet, there’s something desperately missing from these facile proclamations like Medoza’s in the Forbes article:

In the end, companies exist for one reason: to sell their product or service.  If the company can’t sell its product or service, it will fail–and all of the employees and managers will have to go do something else.  Everything that anyone in the company does, at any time, is secondary to the job of selling.

A company that gets too focused purely on selling their product or service runs the risk of losing sight of the partnership between Company and Customer.  They risk taking that Customer for granted and assuming there’s always more where that came from.  But we live in a world of frictionless communication, where we can cross 6 degrees of separation to pull a reference on any product, company, or person with ease.  We live in a world with a long memory, where bad service and bad product anecdotes live on perpetually on the Internet.  We live in a world where recurring revenue is King.  In short, we live in a world where Customers are Empowered and Sales is increasingly weakened.  The balance is inexorably moving to Customers.

It would’ve been more accurate and more enlightening if the Sales department could’ve been named “Closing” instead of “Sales.”  It’s what most of them do, it’s how they think, and it’s typically when they enter the process.  Of course as soon as you go down this line of discussion, the Sales Exec will back up and start talking very smoothly about a focus on Sales and Customers, but that’s a defensive ploy and largely semantics.  Sales is incented for short term performance, but the war is won in the long-term.  Sales are Closers which by definition is a short-term exercise.  Their employers can’t afford to pay them the rates they get to start any earlier in the Sales Funnel.  They wait for buying intent or, to use the jargon for it: they wait for qualified leads.

Ask yourself what’s harder:  convincing people who already want to buy a product like yours to pick yours, or convincing people they need the product in the first place?  Both are critically important, but a surprising amount of the work involved in either challenge has little to do with Sales.  If a company has no budget for your product category and Sales has to go in and create budget, that sends the sales cycle through the roof.  Especially in tough times like these where “creating budget” means a year of meetings and delays.  Sales is simply to expensive a tool to do that work.

Sales relies on Marketing to do its job right to get the word out so people create budget and then actually contact the company and become sales leads. Without leads, Sales accomplishes little selling. Sales relies on Product to build Products that are worth buying. Without something to sell, there can be little selling. Without decent word-of-mouth and references from Delighted Customers, it is a long uphill battle to sell and competitors eat your lunch.  Without great references and a great brand, what do you have left to compete with except price?  That’s a tough place to be in and still pay for expensive sales people.

Perhaps most of all, real scratch-golfing, Rolex timekeeping, Bally-loafer-shod, and Armani-suit-clad Salespeople rely on Market In-Efficiency for their success.  They need to be Information Gatekeepers.  They have to force you to go through them to learn anything.  They’re the guys who will insist prices not be published so they can negotiate.  They don’t like Content Marketing, they want the lead forms filled out in triplicate before they give a prospect the time of day.  The White Papers you’ll typically get are long on hype and short on substance.  Their sole purpose is to get you into a meeting with the Salesperson.  They’re the promise-them-anything-to-get-the-sale then move on to the next one gang.  I don’t mean to say it like it’s a Bad Thing, but it does promote a certain myopic perspective that is not especially well-aligned with a focus on Delighting Customers.  Ask any CIO who is in the business of buying expensive Enterprise Software what they think and they’ll point to scar tissue and tell you quickly that more transparency is always a good thing.

That’s why I tend to bristle anytime someone argues purely that Sales is Job #1.  At best I’ll settle for having Job #1 be Delighting Customers.

In the end, everyone has a role to play–the Closers, the Marketers, the Makers, the Customer Service people (or Customer Success is an even better way to think of it), and the Bean Counters (if nobody took record of the sale or billed the customer, there was no sale, just the cost of product going out the door).  It’s a Team Effort, and it’s very important to keep some perspective on that, particularly the Customer’s perspective if you expect to succeed in the long run.

Posted in business, strategy | 1 Comment »

Why Pay for Mediocre Marketing Advice When Good Advice is Free?

Posted by Bob Warfield on November 22, 2013

snake-oilOkay, it’s time for somebody to call BS on a practice I’ve seen for a long time.  This will probably get me some negative press, but it needs doing.  The practice I’m tired of goes something like this:

–  Entrepreneur starts up a bootstrapped business.  Enjoys modest success and quits Day Job.

–  Suddenly, they are the World’s Foremost Expert on Marketing, and they want to sell that expertise.

–  Often the expertise costs more than the product that let them quit their Day Job and often they make more on the marketing advice than on their “real” business.

I see this happen countless times, and it just strikes me as wrong.  Sure you made a few bucks with that obscure product that teachers love.  Sure you’re on a jihad against unicorns or who knows what.  Sure you quit your Day Job.  But are you really that big a deal that people should be beating down your doors to buy your marketing advice?  Well maybe.  Perhaps you even say you’re kind of a big deal, and in that particular case, you probably are.  But a lot of these folks just haven’t enjoyed that much success.

Ask some basic questions:

1.  What was their signature success that qualifies them to be your marketing mentor?

2.  How big was that success really?  How does that compare with what you hope to achieve?

3.  How many times have they succeeded like that?  Silicon Valley is filled with one trick ponies.

4.  Did they succeed only in frothy bubbly times, or do they have some success when times were tough?

5.  Did they product a big liquidity event or earn a great income year after year?

6.  If their core business is so great, how come they have time to be selling marketing advice?  Why are they selling marketing advice?

7.  If this advice is so special, are the other marketing luminaries quoting them?  Are they even part of that set?  Or are they just being quoted by their customers?  You know, the people that buy these things because they don’t know?

Young Entrepreneurs are vulnerable.  They’d have to be to give up a big chunk of their company for very little cash just so they can be part of an incubator they can learn from.  That’s another one of these deals that’s in the same category for me–you’re paying a lot for some advice that seems mediocre relative to what you can get absolutely for free.  Yeah sure, maybe you’ll make contacts that matter.  Guess what?  It’s not that hard to make contacts and there are cheaper ways to network.  Most successful people are surprisingly generous with their time and advice if you approach it right.

OTOH, maybe this incubator thing is just something you do so somebody will hang a credential on you that dispells some of your insecurity. You think that credential is so others will respect you, but mostly people respect success, not the promise of success.  A lot of this stuff is just getting in the way of getting on with it.  There is no group you can join, no person you can talk to, no degree you can get that will guarantee success.  It’s all up to you, and one of the first things you have to learn is how to sift through all the inputs and get what you really need while ignoring the rest.

I just hate to see people being taken advantage of out of ignorance or insecurity.  I’ve done 7 startups now, founded 4 of the 7, had 3 successful Big Exits (2 acquisitions and an IPO), 3 failures, and 1 very happily still going company.  That’s a pretty reliable track record where small business is concerned.  You don’t get that many hits accidentally.  I did my first run straight out of college in Houston, Texas at the tender age of 23 where there weren’t any incubators or anyone to ask for advice.  Most people thought I was weird or nuts for trying to start a software company instead of getting a real job.

When I was first getting my current bootstrapped company, CNCCookbook, going, I bought a bunch of those marketing products I’m railing against.  6 or 7 of them.  Each one was $75 to $300.  There was LOTs of information there to read.  Lots of formulas for success.  I was hungry to find the knowledge that had to be valuable because it wasn’t available for free.  I had everything from how to get 10 zillion followers on Facebook overnight to the you-betcha-sure-thing Guide to SEO.  But a funny thing happened.  Not one single one of those expensive products taught me anything I hadn’t already learned for free–not one of them!

We live in the age of Content Marketing, Inbound Marketing, or whatever you want to call it.  Many people are giving away extremely high quality information for free, just to get your attention, so they can sell you a real product or service.  You don’t need to pay a bunch of money for Joe-Average-Entrepreneur’s-Startup-Secrets-Snake-Oil-Course.  Real success stories are dying to tell you everything they know.

How can they do that?

It’s a time honored tradition in modern marketing.  So long as they have something else to sell, they give away valuable content free to earn your trust, interest, and attention.  I’ve used this method to build my CNCCookbook web site up to 2 million visitors a year–huge for the CNC Machining niche market.  It’s not that hard to do, but it takes some time, it takes some determination, some love for the subject matter, and the ability to write.  Personally, I think establishing contact with an audience via your content is a critical first step every startup needs to take–even before they have anything to sell.  I didn’t invent this idea–really talented marketing people did, and they’re out there today desperately trying to give away their best ideas to you!

Where’s the good free stuff?  Metaphorically, it is falling from the Internet sky on marketing blogs everywhere.  Seek out the most successful marketing software companies.  You know, the ones that really get content marketing.  There is a vast amount of great information pouring forth from their blogs.  You can even get materials a lot like the “marketing courses” these other guys sell by signing up for a white paper–no charge, they just want you to fill out a contact form.  You gotta believe marketing people who can successfully sell marketing software to other marketing people might just know a little something about marketing!

Here’s my short list of great blogs from marketing software companies:

KISSmetrics

Unbounce

I love split testing

MailChimp

ManageWP

SEOMoz Daily

Buffer Blog

Totango Blog

WordPress.com Blog

ComScore Voices

Get Elastic

Next, find companies selling marketing services such as SEO or other services.  Or they may be marketers that don’t sell anything to other marketers, but they’re just driven to write.  I guess I consider myself in that category.  I love to share information and ideas.  Again, there’s a ton of them with great blogs:

Analytics Talk

Chris Brown’s Branding and Marketing

Convince and Convert

Digital Marketing Blog

Futuristic Play by Andrew Chen

Heidi Cohen

Seth Godin

Quick Sprout (He’s Kind of a Big Deal)

IdeaLaunch

Jeff Bulla’s Blog

Marketing Tech Blog

Marketing Experiments Blog

SaaS Growth Strategies

Spatially Relevant

These people know each other.  They quote each other.  They respect each other.  If you want to learn from an expert, see who the other experts listen to.

Entrepreneur Resources abound too.  Get the word from fellow entrepreneurs and VC’s, but don’t pay for it.  You’ve got Hacker News full of from the horse’s mouth information by entrepreneurs and for entrepreneurs.  You’ve got more and more VC’s going on line to tell you what they think.  You’ve got tons of bootstrappers from 37Signals to SmugMug on down to guys like me, all telling you what they think and how they did it.  And they’re telling you all of that for free, or in some cases for the modest price of a cheap book like 37Signals or Seth Godin.

Stick all of those feeds into your RSS reader, then go find more.  Click through the links in the articles from these blogs–they lead to other rich sources of information.  Fill it up until you’ve always got a few hundred unread articles.  But try very hard to at least scan everything until you’ve got a good feel for what you’re missing if you don’t read.  While you’re scanning, start a ToDo list.  These are ideas from the articles you want to try and topics you need to research more fully.

Too much to read?  What’s the matter, you don’t have time to actually learn what it takes to be successful?  You need to be like a sponge early on, and none of those wanna-be-pay-me-for-my-sure-thing-courses are going to make that any easier than just reading this stuff that’s available for free.  In fact, they’ll make it worse.  They will also bury you in content, then they’ll send you endless emails trying to sell you even more content.  The difference is you are paying them your cash before you even know what you’re really getting.  Plus, you’re reading from one or a few sources and you don’t get to see what correlates and corroborates and resonates across many sources.  These guys I’m pushing above are giving it away for free and you can scan it and delete it if it isn’t of interest.  You’ll get the Gestalt view of it.  You’ll get a gut feel for how it all fits together.

What could be a more valuable way to invest your time?

Still not enough time?  You can add my own clippings blog, Firehose Press, to your RSS Reader.  Those are articles I culled from the Firehose–I subscribe to about 200 blogs–on marketing.  Articles that were good or that moved me to add something to my own personal ToDo list.  It gets updated less and less frequently because once I’ve learned the lesson, I don’t bookmark the same lesson over and over again.

Once you reach the stage where your ToDo list is getting long and you are skimming and deleting more than you’re seriously reading, you’ve lifted the plane off the runway.  Hopefully you’re reaching and audience and your next challenge is to get better at it.  You’ve now got an RSS Feed that’s filled with new ideas for your hopper every single day.  New A/B tests to try.  New tactics and strategies.  New ideas for content.

Good for you.  Instead of buying fish, you’ve now learned how to fish.  Go forth and be prosperous.  But don’t package up what you learned into some cheezy course or seminar.  You got there standing on the shoulders of others.  Help the next guy–reach down, grab their hand, and boost them up.

Posted in bootstrapping, business, strategy | 6 Comments »

Jump Starting a Small Business With Cloud Services

Posted by Bob Warfield on November 18, 2013

PennyPincherSo you want to start a small business, perhaps a bootstrapped tech company?  Good for you, I enjoy mine immensely.  Let me suggest you adopt a rule that I’ve used for a long time:

If it’s available in the Cloud, use the Cloud Service.  Don’t roll your own or manage your own server, even if it is a server in the Cloud.

The thing about a good Cloud Provider (or SaaS service, if you prefer), is that their service is their business.  If they’re doing it right, they can afford to know a lot more about it, do the job a lot better, and deliver it a lot more cheaply than you can.  Meanwhile, you have plenty of work to occupy your time.  Keep your focus on doing those things that uniquely differentiate your business and delegate the rest to the Cloud whenever you can.

That’s the high-level mindset.  Using this approach I have consistently taken companies that had significant IT burdens and gotten them down to where it takes a talented IT guy maybe 1/3 of their time to keep things humming along smoothly.  This for sites that have millions of visitors a year–plenty for most small businesses.  BTW, my instructions to the IT guy were to spend that 1/3 of time automating themselves out of a job.  They’ll never get there, of course, but all progress in that direction is helpful.

Why So Much Cloud Emphasis?

Let’s drill down on why I think that’s the way for small businesses to go.

First, there’s no need to deal with hardware and so that whole time-consuming effort of ordering the servers and setting them up is eliminated. You can turn cloud-based services on or off in seconds.

Second, the cloud-based services know how to manage their services because that’s all they do.  Suppose you choose to base your web presence on WordPress. You could deal with setting up the WP server on an Amazon instance and still be in the Cloud, but now you have to manage it (keep all the security updates going, run backups, optimize for speed, etc.). That takes time and expertise.

Or, you can let a service like Page.ly, ManageWP, or WordPress.com do all that heavy lifting for you.  Now you don’t even have to think about it much—it just happens and they follow industry best practices it would be hard for a small business to emulate.

Third, you can scale up and scale down. Small business traffic is very bursty. One day some big site like Techcrunch writes about you and your site is melting down—nobody can access it. You needed to scale up fast! The next day you’re back to your normal small business traffic. If you had invested the time and money in big scale, it’s wasted on those days laying idle. But, if you choose the right cloud-based host they can scale up and scale down automatically for you.

BTW, this is critical for good Google results as they penalize slow sites on SEO.

Okay, How Can My Business Use the Cloud to Best Effect?

I’ll cover this one by what I see as the critical business phases:

1. Reach your audience

Job #1 has got to be creating a web presence that lets you reach your audience. You need to do this even before you have a product to sell them, because you’ll need to take advantage of the time you spend building product to optimize that audience touch point. Towards that end, you’ll want the following:

–  Web Site with Blog: I highly recommend building that around WordPress using a WordPress Cloud Hosting service. It lets you leverage the huge WordPress ecosystem which means lots of off-the-shelf plugins and know how to make your web site sing with minimal effort on your part.

–  Analytics and A/B Testing: Get hooked up with Google Analytics via a plugin for WordPress so you can monitor what people do on your site and use that feedback to improve your Audience attraction and engagement. A/B Testing lets you try pages side by side to see which one works best. It takes time to optimize, so don’t wait until you’re ready with product. Start day one trying things to see what works.

–  Social Media: Get your Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn pages going ASAP. If nothing else, you need to nail down your presence and brand in those places. Use WordPress plugins to automate the interconnection of Social Media with your web site.

–  Domain: Don’t bother picking a company name until you nail your custom web domain. Read up on SEO aspects of that to make sure the domain is helping you pull traffic. Get yourself a DNS service such as DNSMadeEasy or one that Amazon provides. This will let you tie together disparate Cloud Based services under your brand and domain.  The DNS decides what computers actually get the message when someone types in a URL.  It’s like the central switchboard of your web presence and you’ll use it for all sorts of things.  It’s also your lifeline if some emergency strikes a Cloud provider and you need to bypass them to get to an alternate of some kind.

–  Email: Gear up both your firm’s employee email plus an email service you can use to email customers.  Start building your mailing list day one so you have as big a list as possible available to help when you’re ready to launch. I like services like MailChimp for the mass mailings and services like Google Apps for employee email. Be sure your email service includes easy integration to your WordPress blog and start a weekly email newsletter from day 1.

–  SEO: Learn to master your own SEO activities. It affects every aspect of your web presence. You have two audiences—people and the machines that are performing search at places like Google or Bing. You can’t afford to fail either audience. There are a variety of Cloud Services that can help you with this such

–  Surveys: You need all the feedback you can get to guide your efforts to reach your audience. I like SurveyMonkey and Qualaroo.  Survey Monkey does complex surveys.  Qualaroo does neat little spur of the moment unobtrusive surveys.  Both are extremely useful.  I use Survey Monkey for targeted surveys that go out via email and blog posts.  You get a survey when your free trial ends.  I use them to research market topics.  They’re great for creating interesting content–people love to read survey results.  Qualaroo is on key web pages asking:

“Would you recommend this product?”  on the download page

“What articles should we be writing?”  on the blog

“What can we do to make this product more likely something you could buy and use?”  on the pricing page and elsewhere.

–  Customer Service:  Customer Service isn’t just about fixing product problems.  It’s about giving your audience a way to reach you and a way to reach each other to engage.  As such, it’s worth setting these systems up from Day 1.  For my businesses, I want a Customer Service solution that offers a pretty big menu:

Trouble Ticketing.  This is the classic Customer Service app but it’s the one you’ll use the least often if you’re doing it right.  Consider Trouble Tickets to be a failure.  A failure to prevent the problem before it started.  A failure in documentation or user interface/experience.  A failure to communicate.  The customer’s point of last resort.  You have to have Trouble Ticketing, but you want to do everything in your power to make sure Customers never have to use it.

Idea Storming:  I love giving customers every possible way to provide feedback.  Ideation is the ability to put an idea on an idea board and vote on it.  Give customers a fixed scarce number of votes and then pay attention.  Whatever rises to the top on the voting is something you need to deal with.

Forums:  Own your own forums even though there are lots of forums out there.  Make them private and require some form of sign up.  This is your exclusive User Club.  Be very responsive on the forums.  Go there first and Trouble Tickets second.  If you help someone with a problem on the forums, others can see the answer and potentially be helped in the future.  If you help someone by closing a Trouble Ticket, you only helped them and the effort is not leveraged.

Knowledge Base:  You want a KB integrated with the rest of the Customer Service experience so that as someone enters a Trouble Ticket, they are directed to KB articles that can potentially help.

I use a service called User Voice to do all those things except the forums.  I use a free BBS service for that.

2. Build your product

If you’ve got a software company, or perhaps an e-commerce company, you’ve got to build some software.  There are helpful Cloud services here too:

–  Source Control: You need source control day one.  Being without it is like jumping out of an airplane without a parachute.  I like Github but there are lots of others.

–  Bug Tracking: For bug tracking and the like, Atlassian and others have this base covered. Don’t confuse it with Customer Service software, which I will cover under E-Commerce.

–  Online information resources: There are so many here I can’t begin to count, but we live in an age where there are literally thousands of developers helping each other online in all kinds of ways.  StackExchange can answer almost any technical question you might have. Online forums are there too for more specific areas.

–  Consulting: Need quick design work but don’t have a designer on staff yet? Need a specialized piece of code written that’s just part of your solution but nobody knows how? Need a little extra testing help or maybe some tech writing? There are tons of services like Elance that can get you some high quality temporary help.

3. E-Commerce

For this stage, you have a vibrant audience, big and growing email list, and your product has had a successful free Beta test. Time to start charging. Here are some things you may need to take the order, process payments, and handle the accounting:

–  Shopping Cart: If you chose WordPress, there are tons of plugins to help. But, they’re not the only game in town either.

–  Payment Processing: Who will process credit cards for you? Lots of possibilities ranging from Paypal to Stripe.  Be sure your processor covers International sales and any special needs you may have, like recurring payments for subscription services.

–  Accounting: A lot of these services can connect to QuickBooks to make your bookkeeping easier.  Scope that out in advance.

How Do I Choose the Right Service?

With so many different kinds of Cloud Service, it is hard to be specific. So, I’ll talk about the generic:

– Look for an online and vocal fan club for the service. It doesn’t take long with Google to see which services are loved and which ones are marginal.

– Look for companies similar to yours that use the service proving someone else has tried it and succeeded. Try to contact those companies and see what they think of the service. I’m not talking competitors—they won’t help. But there are always similar kinds of companies that don’t compete at all.

– Make sure you have a roadmap for what you need your services to be able to do for at least the next 2 years. Get your developers and others to review the proposed service against the roadmap and make sure you won’t have to switch down the road. It’s a good exercise to have that Roadmap available anyway—it’s just a wish list of everything you want to do for Marketing, E-Commerce, and Product over the next 2 years.

– Get your developers to look carefully at the published API’s for the services. Even if you won’t be using any API’s early, someday you might. The quality of the API’s is an indication of how well architected the service is too.

Conclusion

You can build a pretty amazing online Customer Experience if you make full use of available Cloud Services as described.  If you have build all of it, set up the servers, do the backups, install all the updates, and so on, you’ll be wasting a lot of your time that could be spent doing other things.

Posted in bootstrapping, business, cloud | Leave a Comment »

 
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